How big do African violets grow?

Recommended Varieties African violets are typically classified by size, based on how wide they grow: Miniature: less than 8 inches across. Standard: 8–16 inches across. Large: more than 16 inches across.

How long do African violets take to grow?

Place the sealed box in an east or south window. Young violet plants will appear in 8 to 10 weeks and be ready for transplanting in three months. When potting newly rooted cuttings, it is wise not to add fertilizer.

Are African violets slow growing?

First the African Violet plant will slow down in growth and begin a stunted growth period. The leaves will be smaller in size, they become brittle and hard to touch and shiny in appearance.

How long do African violets live?

African violets can live a long time, as long as 50 years! To get them there, you need to provide good care which includes repotting African violets. The trick is knowing when to repot an African violet and what soil and container size to use.

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Should you deadhead African violets?

Deadhead African violets to encourage more blooms. African violets make useful flowering houseplants since they can bloom for up to nine months per year. They do need the other three months off as a rest period.

Where do African violets grow best?

Where to Grow African Violets. African violets are strictly indoor plants in North America, largely because their leaves need to stay dry. Grow plants in bright, indirect light for the best color and blooms. A plant stand three feet away from a west- or south-facing window is an ideal location.

Do African violets bloom all year?

A: African violets are capable of blooming year -round in the home, but they won’t bloom reliably if one or more of their basic needs are not being met. The most likely reason African violets stop blooming is because they’re in too little light.

Can African violets go outside?

African violets are tropical plants from East Africa. That’s why they make good indoor plants. They would never survive outdoors in most U.S. climates as a normal violet would. You can buy these plants almost anywhere, including grocery stores and garden centers.

Do African violets need a lot of sun?

African violets need bright light to bloom, but cannot tolerate hot, direct sun because their leaves are easily scorched by intense light.

Do African violets like to be crowded?

Violets need to feel crowded to bloom, but when a plant gets too big for its pot, divide the plant’s separate-looking leaf heads. Place in potting soil after the roots and leaves become well formed.

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Do African violets like to be root bound?

Contrary to what you might have heard, African violets do not like to be root bound. Roots of African violets grow out from the center more than they grow down. If you plant your violet in a pot that is as deep as it is wide, the roots will fill the diameter but will not get down to the lower part of the potting soil.

How often should you water African violets?

“ How often to water African violets?” is perhaps the most pondered African violet dilemma. The best guide is to feel the top of the soil: if it is dry to the touch, then it is time to water. African violets should be allowed to dry out between each watering for best results. Overwatering can kill a plant.

What kills African violets?

Use a broadleaf killer that contains 2,4-D or Dicamba, and it will selectively kill the violets without damaging the grass. Another great wild violet herbicide is called Drive (quinclorac). Quinclorac is also sold in other lawn weed control products, under differing names.

Do African violets die of old age?

The life span of an African violet is long — in fact, they can live forever, according to the Bay State African Violet Society. Of course, this doesn’t mean you can plant them and leave them alone.

How do you rejuvenate African violets?

If a majority of the roots are still white or light-colored, prune off the rotted roots, and re-pot the plant in soil for African violets in a container with several drainage holes. You can water from top or bottom with water at room temperature or slightly warmer. Make sure the plant to drain well.

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